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Tuesday Tips: Disaster Preparation, Egypt and Fire!

Do you have a disaster plan for yourself and your pets? If not, make plans now! You never know when disaster will strike. For instance, I hadn’t a clue that the several “booms” yesterday followed by a power outage was more than a temporary inconvenience. Then I noticed smoke—outside—quite some distance from the house. No problem—the next door golf course often burned trash. But when the dog barked (GOOD BOY!), and I left my upstairs office to check, smoke had begun to come into the kitchen. Yikes! I grabbed my phone, and ran out to check – this video (about 3-4 minutes) will show you what I found.

We were lucky. Grass fires are common in North Texas, and other parts of the country. Would you know what to do if (heaven forbid!) your pets were caught in the burn? Here’s a brief first aid guide to treating pet burns and smoke inhalation, but I hope you’ll never need it.

On the same “disaster prep” theme, I wanted to update you on my friend and colleague Heike. She’s safe in Germany with her son Jan. But she had to leave her pets behind. Heike was prepared, though, and made arrangements for a neighbor to care for the kitties, and left her dog with Candy’s Kennel, a terrific facility. Enjoy the pictures.

Egyptian Persian mix Sir Kimo
Heike writes, “(above) our Egyptian Persian mix “Sir Kimo”, rescued on 31/12/2004 when we found him severely injured and undernourished on our staircase.”

Egyptian Siamese Miss Noha
“Our Egyptian Siamese, Miss Noha.”

Jan with dog Lucky

“My son Jan Henrik Syllwasschy and our dog Lucky “Woolsy” Syllwasschy.”

Donkey cart transport
“Typical transportation means, donkey & cart, often overloaded.  Also many other animals which do not directly work in the tourism industry, e.g. donkeys pulling carts, are suffering from overloading of vehicles, groundless punishments and beating, and malnutrition.”

Camels, Horses for tourists at Giza pyramids
“Camels & horses waiting for tourists @ Giza pyramids, very often undernourished even in good times. As tourists refrain from visiting Egypt these days, many riding stables let their horses and camels starve to death since they lack income and cannot afford the food for their animals. dpa and n-tv report on dying horses in the streets around the Giza pyramids, where usually horses and camels carry the tourists to the

Candys Kennel
“Candy’s Kennel, private kennel operated by Mrs. Hend Kotb, currently home to 30+ rescued dogs, all food/medical treatment/labor privately financed.” This is where her dog currently is being housed until Heike’s return (she hopes) this week. Few companion animals in Egypt have it so good, though. This article about Cairo’s cats will strike a chord with all animal lovers, and the efforts of a fledgling animal welfare effort give hope. Check out Egyptian Society for Mercy to Animals (ESMA).

Heike further writes, “The current political situation increases the suffering of the animals in Egypt.  Many animals are suffering from wounds resulting from bad saddles, or suffer from injuries of joints from overload or other abuse, resulting in terrible pain when carrying people.”

Check out the FaceBook page for The Egyptian Society for Animal Friends. Heike says, “ESAF are doing tremendous work to save horses/camels together with Brooke Hospital, and they have tons of pics on their page. You can contact one of their members Sonia Zollner for permission to use some pics in your newsletter. I have already written to her that we are raising causes, and just mention my name to her, i am sure she won’t object!”

So spread the word–and the furry love. Be prepared for the worst, hope for the best, and reach out to help when disaster strikes.

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About amyshojai

Amy Shojai, CABC is a certified animal behavior consultant, award winning author, and spokesperson to the pet industry.

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