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Woof Wednesday: National Dog Show & Ask Amy Grooming

Tomorrow is Thanksgiving and everyone knows what that means–NATIONAL DOG SHOW! The Kennel Club of Philadelphia for the past several years have held this show the weekend before Thanksgiving, and then NBC televised the production after the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. It’s become an annual favorite of dog people. And because I’m at the Cat Writers Association Annual Conference during the actual event, I’m pleased to see the show up-close-and-personal courtesy of Purina sponsorship.

My colleague David Frei is a longtime breeder, exhibitor and dog expert/author who co-hosts the show with dog lover, author and actor John O’Hurley. Interestingly, the inspiration for televising the show can from a tongue-in-furry-cheek movie fave of dog people everywhere titled ‘Best In Show.’ The two-hour special offers over 160-plus breeds and crowns a Best in Show champion before football takes over the day.

The American Kennel Club (AKC) has sanctioned six new breeds for 2011 and they will be introduced to America in their national television debuts on Thanksgiving Day during the show. Thanks to the National Dog Show, you’ll get a sneak peak, below.

And don’t miss the ASK AMY video at the bottom of the blog with some comments about dog show grooming.

American English Coonhound

AMERICAN ENGLISH COONHOUND

The American English Coonhound evolved from Virginia Hounds, descendants of English Foxhounds. Originally these hounds were used to hunt fox by day and raccoons by night and were named the English Fox and Coonhound. Today’s American English Coonhound is a wide-ranging hunter that possesses tremendous speed and endurance, and excellent voice. A strong and graceful athlete, he needs regular exercise to stay in peak shape. The breed’s hard, protective coat is of medium length and can be red and white ticked, blue and white ticked, tri-colored with ticking, red and white, and white and black. The breed is pleasant, alert, confident and sociable with both humans and dogs.

Search on Facebook:  American English Coonhound Association

Cesky Terrier

CESKY TERRIER

The Cesky Terrier was developed to be a well-muscled, short legged and well-pigmented hunting terrier that could be worked in packs. The Cesky Terrier has natural drop ears and a natural tail. The Cesky is longer than it is tall and has a topline that rises slightly higher over the loin and rump. It sports a soft, long, silky coat in shades of gray from Charcoal to Platinum. The correct coat is clipped to emphasize a slim impression. The hallmarks of the breed should be unique unto itself with a lean body and graceful movement. They are reserved towards strangers, loyal to their owners, but ever keen and alert during the hunt.

Entlebucher Mountain Dog

ENTLEBUCHER MOUNTAIN DOG 

The Entlebucher Mountain Dog is a native of Switzerland, and the smallest of the four Swiss breeds.  A medium-sized drover, he has a short, tri-colored coat with symmetrical markings. Purpose and heritage have resulted in an unusually intense bonding between the Entlebucher and his master.  Prized for his work ethic and ease of training, he can transform from a high-spirited playmate to a serious, self-assured dog of commanding presence. The Entlebucher should not be considered a breed for the casual owner. The guardian traits of this breed require thorough socialization, and he will remain an active, energetic dog for his entire lifetime.

Finnish Lapphund

FINNISH LAPPHUND

The Finnish Lapphund is a reindeer herding dog from the northern parts of Scandinavia.  The breed is thought to have existed for hundreds, if not thousands, of years, as the helper dog of the native tribes.  In modern day, Lapphunds are popular as family pets in their native Finland.  They are devoted to their family, friendly with all people, highly intelligent and eager to learn.  The dogs have a thick, dense coat that comes in a variety of colors and beautiful, soft, expressive faces.  They are strong but very agile.

Norwegian Lundehund

NORWEGIAN LUNDEHUND

The Norwegian Lundehund – or Puffin Dog — spent centuries on the rocky cliffs and high fields of arctic Norway hunting and retrieving puffin birds, an important meat and feather crop to local farmers. Uniquely equipped for their task, this little Spitz-type dog has at least six toes on each foot for stability in the near vertical environs where puffins nest. A flexible skeletal structure enables the dog to squirm out of tight spots or spread-eagle to prevent slips and falls. Lundehunds have a protective double coat, reddish-brown, often with white collar and feet and a white tip on the tail. Today puffin birds are protected and the puffin dog has taken up its new role as an alert, cheerful and somewhat mischievous companion.

Xoloitzcuintli

XOLOITZCUINTLI (show-low-itz-quint-lee)

The Xoloitzcuintli – “show-low” as it is commonly called – is the national dog of Mexico.  Previously known as the Mexican Hairless, it comes in three sizes as well as a coated version – seen in the show ring only in the US and Canada.  These dogs descend from hairless dogs prized by the Aztecs and revered as guardians of the dead.  Over 400 years later, these dogs were still to be found in the Mexican jungles.  Shaped by the environment rather than by man, their keen intelligence, trainability and natural cleanliness have made them a unique and valued pet today.

BIG HAIRY DEAL & MOVING TOPIARY?

So what’s up with all the special grooming that show dogs endure–or do they like it? What do YOU think? Do you share your life with a show dog, or maybe a hunting companion? How do you handle their coat care? Does your Cock-a-dach-a-poo get a Poodle cut? Or does the Lab prefer a regular hosing off?

Do you have a show dog? Have you ever attended a dog show–you gotta do it! The best dog of all, of course, paws down–whether they have ribbons or not–is the canine companion who shares your heart.

SPECIAL THANKS

This month as a special “thank you” to all my furry-fantastic-followers, I’ll give away a paw-tographed copy of Complete Care for Your Aging Cat and Complete Care for Your Aging Dog. To get in the running, simply post a comment in the blog about your special pet (old fogey or not) and I’ll draw two names at the end of the month. You can use these award-winning updated books as a resource for yourself or wrap up for a pet-friendly holiday gift to a fur-loving friend. And as an EXTRA-special incentive–and to encourage all of y’all to mentor each other and spread the blogging/twitter/Facebook love–the two winners get to name one purr-son who gives them wags of support and deserves a book, too!

#AskAmy Sweet Tweets

Folks who “follow” me on Twitter @amyshojai and @About_Puppies are the most awesome Sweet Tweets around–they love #cats and #dogs and #pets, many #amwriting. We’ve become a great community including those in the #MyWANA social network twibe hosted by the awesome @KristenLambTX.  So I’m stealing borrowing Kristen’s methods and creating my own hashtag. Just follow and include the #AskAmy in your tweets if’n you’re interested in pithy links to articles, books, blogs, experts, fictioning and sparkle-icity!

I love hearing from you, so please share comments and questions. Do you have an ASK AMY question you’d like answered? Stay up to date on all the latest just subscribe the blog, “like” me on Facebook, listen to the weekly radio show, check out weekly FREE PUPPY CARE newsletter, and sign up for Pet Peeves newsletter with pet book give-aways!

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About amyshojai

Amy Shojai, CABC is a certified animal behavior consultant, award winning author, and spokesperson to the pet industry.

4 responses »

  1. Tess’ parents are both award winning hunting champions. When I purchsed her from the breeder, they almost kept her as a show dog because of her ears. She was bound for greatness with her beauty, form and brains. And she has….but unfortunately not in the ring but just in mylife.
    Knowing how Tess loves to learn and to be challenged, I think she’d have loved either. As would have I! 🙂

    Reply
  2. I prefer a Pomeranian for my companion dog. They’re small and portable, but they have huge hearts and lots of love to share. They also have enough hair for six dogs. I think dogs enjoy being groomed if they’re treated with kindness and respect during grooming.

    I groom my Pom on a near daily basis. He hated it when he first came to live with me, but he’s learning that it is not a form of abuse. I sing to him while I groom and praise him often.

    I said all that to day I bet show dogs who are treated well love their grooming.

    Reply
    • Hi Catie, thanks for visiting the blog! Love those Poms–they have BIG dog attitudes with all the beauty and brains of their sled dog relatives but in a lap size. When I sing to my dog he howls along, LOL! Everyone’s a critic. Glad your special Pom has begun to accept grooming. Doncha hate those doggy hairballs? *s*

      Reply

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